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U.S. MEN'S NATIONAL TEAM

May 14, 2010
THE WORLD CUP BID
The nuts and bolts of the U.S. bid


Here are the basics of the U.S. bid for either the 2018 or 2022 World Cups. A five-man delegation will present the bid book to FIFA at its headquarters in Zurich, Switzerland Friday.

The delegation

The delegation from the USA Bid Committee will include U.S. Soccer president and USA Bid Committee chairman Sunil Gulati, USA Bid Committee executive director David Downs, USA Bid Committee managing director John Kristick and U.S. National Team captain Carlos Bocanegra. The fifth member of the U.S. delegation also was to be picked. The delegation will present the bid book to FIFA President Joseph “Sepp” Blatter and FIFA Secretary General Jerome Valcke.

The process

The United States and eight competing bids will each have 15 minutes to present their bid book and conduct a question and answer session with assembled media during this ceremony that is open to the media. The submission of the official bid books begin a seven-month review process that will include site visits by FIFA Executive Committee members to each bidding nation and culminate with the selection of the host countries for the 2018 and 2022 World Cups in Zurich on Dec. 2.

Each delegation will be greeted on stage by Blatter and Valcke of FIFA with the head of the delegation joining them at the center of the stage where Blatter will make a welcome address to the delegation. The head of the delegation will then make a short address to FIFA and make the official handover of the bid book to Blatter who will conclude the presentation with thank you remarks to the bidding delegation and a photograph with the entire delegation at the center of the stage. Blatter and Valcke will then leave the stage with the bid book and the representatives of the bidding delegations will be able to speak with the assembled media for 15 minutes.

The other candidates

In addition to the United States, Australia, England and Russia have formally declared their desire to host the FIFA World Cup™ in 2018 or 2022 and will present their bid books to FIFA on Friday as well. Netherlands-Belgium and Portugal-Spain will each submit joint bids for the 2018 and 2022 tournaments, while Japan, Qatar and South Korea are only bidding to host the tournament in 2022. Indonesia withdrew its bid in March 2010, while Mexico withdrew its bid in September 2009. Following the Mexico announcement, CONCACAF issued a public endorsement for the United States bid in November that pledged the full support of soccer’s governing body for North and Central America and the Caribbean.

The stadiums

The U.S. bid book includes 18 host city finalists (alphabetically): Atlanta, Baltimore, Boston, Dallas, Denver, Houston, Indianapolis, Kansas City, Los Angeles, Miami, Nashville, New York, Philadelphia, Phoenix, San Diego, Seattle, Tampa and Washington, D.C. The list of host cities includes 21 stadiums that are in compliance with FIFA’s requirements to be included in the bid book to FIFA. With the new Meadowlands Stadium now open, all 21 of the stadiums included in the United States bid currently exist and 18 have been built or renovated within the last 20 years. The venues average capacities of more than 76,000 spectators while 12 of the stadiums feature capacities between 75,000 and 94,000 fans.

Stadium criteria

FIFA’s criterion requires a candidate host nation to provide stadiums capable of seating 40,000 or more spectators. Stadiums with a minimum capacity of 80,000 are required by FIFA for consideration to play host to the opening match or final match, a qualification met by seven of the stadiums set for inclusion in the United States bid. The U.S. used stadiums in nine cities when it hosted the 1994 World Cup while establishing overall and average attendance records that still stand today despite the expansion of the tournament from 52 to 64 matches beginning in 1998.

Each delegation will be greeted on stage by Blatter and Valcke of FIFA with the head of the delegation joining them at the center of the stage where Blatter will make a welcome address to the delegation. The head of the delegation will then make a short address to FIFA and make the official handover of the bid book to Blatter who will conclude the presentation with thank you remarks to the bidding delegation and a photograph with the entire delegation at the center of the stage. Blatter and Valcke will then leave the stage with the bid book and the representatives of the bidding delegations will be able to speak with the assembled media for 15 minutes.





   
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